English

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

The Department of English supports the core curriculum with student-centered instruction in languages, literature, composition, speech, and journalism, and prepares students for graduate study and varied professional careers. The Department also supports the mission of the college by helping to produce graduates who express themselves clearly through writing and speaking, use technology skillfully, demonstrate the ability to do independent research, and exhibit a strong commitment to service.

The Department of English offers two Bachelor of Arts degrees: one in English with a   concentration in Traditional Liberal Arts and one in journalism. The Department also offers a Bachelor of Science degree in English with a teaching concentration in Language Arts (grades 6-12).

English majors interested in law may participate in the Pre-law Program described in “Special Programs.” This program includes elective courses in writing, speech, theatre, social science, and other liberal arts, which will help majors acquire the knowledge and skills needed for the intense competition for admission to law school.

The Department encourages the use of English as part of a double major for any discipline for students interested in increasing employment options and in preparing for graduate or professional schools. Through internships and practicum, students gain beneficial work experience.

A major in English prepares graduates for graduate/professional study and/or careers in the following areas: public speaking, mass media, English, law, editing, education, communication, advertising, business, information processing, technical writing, and library science.

A major in journalism prepares graduates for graduate/professional study and/or careers in the profession: mass media, editing, advertising, business, publishing, and public relations.

English majors seeking secondary teaching certification must follow the state curriculum of prospective teachers of English Language Arts and maintain the 2.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA) required for admission to the Stillman Teacher Education Program (STEP). Students admitted to the English program must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in English and must pass ENG 199/200, or the equivalency courses: ENG 131/132, and in the second semester of the sophomore year, must participate in a skills assessment for guidance purposes.

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ENG 131 : English Composition I

This course focuses on developing writing skills in expository modes and requires the writing of papers in classification/division, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, and argument modes. Satisfies general education requirement.

Credits 3

ENG 132 : English Composition II

This course focuses on the reinforcement of skills in the areas noted for ENG 131 and requires the writing of one’s perspective on an issue, a documented paper, analysis of a poem, and analysis of a short story.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

Satisfies general education requirement.

ENG 199 : English Composition I for English and Journalism Majors

This the first course of the freshman English requirement for English and Journalism students who have indicated an interest in English and/or Journalism as a major. It develops writing skills in a range of formal and informal texts involved with expository modes (form) in comparison/contrast, classification/division, causal analysis, and argument. It is designed to provide intensive practice in writing—a recursive process—and related skills (analytical reading, speaking, and listening). The course gives attention to language and mechanics relevant to grammar and usage appropriate for the writing process. Prerequisite: Declaration of intention to major in English or journalism. Taken by majors in place of ENG 131.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

Declaration of intention to major in English or journalism.

ENG 200 : English Composition II for English and Journalism Majors

This the second course of the freshman English requirement for English and Journalism students who have indicated an interest in English and/or Journalism as a major. This course focuses on the reinforcement of skills in the areas noted in English 199—formal and informal texts involved with expository modes (form) in comparison/contrast, classification/division, causal analysis, and argument. It is designed to provide intensive practice in writing—a recursive process—and related skills (analytical reading, speaking, and listening). And the course requires the writing of argument/persuasion (concerning various rhetorical situations) and research papers. The course gives attention to language and mechanics relevant to grammar and usage appropriate for the writing process. Taken by majors in place of ENG 132.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

Declaration of intention to major in English or journalism.

ENG 231 : American Literature I

This course is a comprehensive introduction to American literature from the early writings of the Puritans to the American Romantics, and through the American Civil War (1865), with attention to the cultural and social contexts in which all of these literatures were produced. The course includes a survey of important religious, political, genre, and cultural views, such as Puritan beliefs, including Horn books, adventure tales from Revolutionary and Enlightenment ideas, including adventure stories for adolescents, and Transcendentalism, while engaging questions of race, gender, social class, and family units. The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different literary theories relevant to the variety of literature focused on adult and adolescent readers and engage in interpretative collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 232 : American Literature II

This course is a comprehensive introduction to American literature beginning from 1865 through the present, including major American historical literary movements, such as Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism, with attention to the cultural and social contexts in which all of these literatures were produced and will engage questions of race, gender, and class. The course also gives attention to the development of specific literature aimed at the adolescent audience by incorporating literatures, such as Mark Twain, Barbara Sewell, Dr. Seuss, and Lois Lowry. The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different literary theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 235 : Technical Writing

This course is an introduction to technical writing and is intended for students in scientific and technical disciplines as well as for English majors and majors in other disciplines who want to develop technical writing skills. Primary focus is on building skills and using strategies required in writing proposals, progress reports, correspondence, and research reports.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 236 : English Literature I

This course is a comprehensive introduction to English literature from its beginning in the medieval period, and continuing through the Renaissance, the Restoration, and up to 1800. The course focuses on major movements in English historical traditions, as well as individual literary voices and styles. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them civil war, religious dissent, revolution, commercialization, colonialism, and industrialization. The course also gives attention to adolescent literature by focusing on adventure tales and poetry, such as Daniel Defoe and William Blake. Assessment tools are used to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200. 

ENG 237 : English Literature II

This course is a comprehensive introduction to English literature beginning in 1800 to the present, including the Romantic, Victorian, Pre-Raphaelite, Modern, and Post-Modern eras. The course focuses on major movements in English historical traditions, as well as individual literary voices and styles including adolescent authors from Lewis Carroll to J.K. Rowling. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them revolution, Darwinism, industrialization and colonization, world war, and post-colonialism as well as fantasy. The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 238 : African American Literature I

This course a survey of African American contributions to American literature from the earliest African American writings up to the Harlem Renaissance (1917), giving attention to all literary genres, and with a particular focus on the following literary forms and cultural influences: the Middle Passage, the Slave Narrative, the Antebellum period, and Reconstruction.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 239 : African American Literature II

This course is a survey of African American contributions to American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, giving attention to all literary genres, and with a particular focus on the following cultural influences: the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Urban Realism, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the Black Arts Movement, the 1970s Renaissance, and the Black Women’s Movement.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 330 : World Literature

This course is a study of the wide variety of literary works which appeals to adolescent and/or adult readers from several nations, beginning with classical Greece and continuing through 20th century European, African, Latin American, and Asian works. The course also gives attention to possible assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 331 : Advanced Rhetorical Grammar

This course is a study of English grammar in context to expository writing. Content will focus on the conventions of English language as they relate to traditional and contemporary grammatical, stylistic (formal and informal text), and rhetorical writing (with attention to audience, context, and purpose), all of which will be used to understand the concept of dialect and grammar systems in order to revise written assignments. This course will teach grammar and will provide practice in rhetorical modes. The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the acquisition of language and the influence of English language on the arts through a variety of literature covered, and students are exposed to different social languages present in society and will engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles. Students teach/present a grammar lesson derived from the literature of the course.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 333 : Writing Argument

This course is designed to develop critical thinking skills in analyzing and structuring argument. It will address the nature of argument, values, refutation, fallacies, tests for credible evidence, and the use of language. It will also require some research and presentation of oral arguments.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 334 : Chaucer

This course focuses on literature of the Middle English period, with particular attention to Chaucer.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200 and sophomore/junior class standing.

ENG 335 : Shakespeare

This course is a study of a particular genre (drama) and age of Shakespeare through a detailed examination of his plays (via print sources and non-print media) and a brief review of several relevant plays of his contemporaries. The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200 and sophomore/junior class standing.

ENG 336 : Creative Writing

This course provides instruction and practice in writing poems, short stories, and one-act plays. Special attention is given to diction, tone, point of view, and the distinctions between expository writing and creative writing. Students will be required to submit writing to creative writing contests and/or to publications.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200 and ENG 230.

ENG 338 : Development of the Novel

This course is a study of the development of American and British novels from the 18th through the 20th centuries, focusing on critical and analytical reading and writing about the literature.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 339 : Modern Black Fiction

This course focuses on reading and writing about representative short stories and novels by Black writers from the 1920s to the present.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 400 : Independent Study/Internship/Practicum

This course allows students to concentrate on topics or specific research projects related to student needs and interests to meet graduation requirements or prepare for graduate study. Independent study may also allow students to enroll in specific courses not scheduled in a given semester. Must be approved by Division Dean.

Credits 3

ENG 402 : English Language Arts Practicum

In this course, students will strengthen their language and writing skills and gain experience in teaching/tutoring students in English fundamentals and in writing, under the supervision and mentorship of a member of the English faculty. Requires consent of the Department Chair, work in the Writing Center, and field experience.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

and 6 hours of English/American Survey literature.

ENG 430 : Literary Criticism

This course is a survey of major theories of literary criticism. Emphasis will be on the development of the student’s ability to read, interpret, and write about literature through the application of the theories. The course also gives attention to possible assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 434 : African Literature

This course is an introduction to the written prose, poetry, and drama of Africa. Literature in both African languages (in translation) and in English will be covered, including representative works and genres from West, East, and Southern Africa.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200.

ENG 435 : Poetry

This course is an in-depth study of how to read and analyze poetry. Attention will be focused on theme, figurative language, imagery, symbol, meter, rhyme and versification. Writing critical papers will be a basic part of the course.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200 or junior/senior class standing.

ENG 436 : Caribbean Literature

This course is an introductory study of contemporary Caribbean literature with attention to the main literary movements and trends, as well as its most outstanding authors and their writings.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

or ENG 199-200 or junior/senior class standing.

ENG 437 : Major Writers

This course is a focused study of the works of three to five authors. Offerings may include John Milton, William Butler Yeats, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, or other combinations of major writers of poetry and fiction. The course also gives attention to possible assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

(or ENG 199-200) and 3 hours of English/American survey literature.

ENG 438 : Senior Thesis in English

This is a multi-faceted course that studies the analyses of literary works and focuses on the recursive process of completing the senior thesis; aims to strengthen the student’s ability to research, interpret, and synthesize information; to read carefully and think critically; to write skillfully; and to develop presentation skills (via contemporary technologies). The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different literary theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations and peer-workshops) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

(or ENG 199-200), and 6 hours of English/American literature.

ENG 439 : Modern Drama

This course is a comprehensive introduction demonstrating to students how to experience the variety of the modern drama. The course content focuses on the development of modern drama and the examination of both print and non-print drama. It includes topics, such as structure of modern theater, structure of modern play, and reading and performing modern drama. The course also gives attention to assessment tools to measure comprehension of literature studied, written about, and researched. Students explore different theories relevant to the variety of literature covered and may engage in collaborative communication through group dynamics (i.e., oral presentations, peer-review workshops, and pairings) that build students’ leadership roles.

Credits 3

Prerequisites

(or ENG 199-200), and ENG 232. Required for English majors with a language arts/secondary education concentration.